No More Backdoors: Know Who Has Access to What, Right Now
Jun 13
Virtual
Register Today
Teleport logoTry For Free
Fork me on GitHub

Teleport

MySQL Automatic User Provisioning

Prerequisites

  • Teleport cluster v14.1 or higher with a configured self-hosted MySQL or RDS MySQL database.
  • Ability to connect to and create user accounts in the target database.
  • Automatic user provisioning is not compatible with MySQL versions lower than 8.0.
  • Automatic user provisioning is not compatible with RDS Aurora reader endpoints.

Step 1/3. Configure database admin

Teleport should be able to connect to the database as a user that can create other users and assign them roles. We recommend creating a separate user designated specifically for Teleport automatic user provisioning. Let's call it teleport-admin.

Teleport uses the same authentication mechanism when connecting as an admin user as for regular user connections: X.509 for self-hosted databases and AWS IAM for RDS.

The admin user must have privileges within the database to create users and grant them privileges. The admin user must also have privileges to monitor user processes and role assignments.

In addition, a schema is required for the admin user to log into by default. Stored procedures are also created and executed from this schema.

The RDS MySQL admin user must use AWSAuthenticationPlugin to allow IAM authentication:

CREATE USER 'teleport-admin' IDENTIFIED WITH AWSAuthenticationPlugin AS 'RDS';
GRANT SELECT ON mysql.role_edges TO 'teleport-admin' ;
GRANT PROCESS, ROLE_ADMIN, CREATE USER ON *.* TO 'teleport-admin' ;

CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS `teleport`;
GRANT ALTER ROUTINE, CREATE ROUTINE, EXECUTE ON `teleport`.* TO 'teleport-admin' ;

The self-hosted MySQL admin user must have X.509 authentication configured:

CREATE USER "teleport-admin" REQUIRE SUBJECT "/CN=teleport-admin";
GRANT SELECT ON mysql.role_edges TO 'teleport-admin' ;
GRANT PROCESS, ROLE_ADMIN, CREATE USER ON *.* TO 'teleport-admin' ;

CREATE DATABASE IF NOT EXISTS `teleport`;
GRANT ALTER ROUTINE, CREATE ROUTINE, EXECUTE ON `teleport`.* TO 'teleport-admin' ;

Users created by Teleport will be assigned the teleport-auto-user role in the database, which will be created automatically if it doesn't exist.

Next, configure the database admin user in the Teleport database configuration:

db_service:
  enabled: "yes"
  databases:
  - name: "example"
    protocol: "mysql"
    uri: "localhost:3306"
    admin_user:
      name: "teleport-admin"
kind: db
version: v3
metadata:
  name: example
spec:
  protocol: "mysql"
  uri: "localhost:3306"
  admin_user:
    name: "teleport-admin"
Auto-discovered databases

For auto-discovered cloud databases, the name of the admin user is taken from the teleport.dev/db-admin label.

Step 2/3. Configure a Teleport role

To specify the database roles a user should be assigned within the database, use the db_roles role option:

kind: role
version: v7
metadata:
  name: auto-db-users
spec:
  options:
    # create_db_user_mode enables automatic user provisioning for matching databases
    create_db_user_mode: keep
  allow:
    db_labels:
      "*": "*"
    db_names:
    - "*"
    # db_roles is a list of roles the database user will be assigned
    db_roles:
    - reader
    - "{{internal.db_roles}}"
    - "{{external.db_roles}}"

With automatic user provisioning, users always connect to the database with their Teleport username so the db_users role field is ignored for roles that have database user provisioning enabled.

The available provisioning modes are:

  • off: Disables user provisioning.

  • keep: Enables user provisioning and disables users at session end. The user will be stripped of all roles and the user account will be locked.

  • best_effort_drop: Enables user provisioning and, when the session ends, drops the user if no resources depend on it. In cases where any resource depends on the user, it falls back to disabling the user, mirroring the behavior of keep mode.

Users created within the database will:

  • Be assigned the teleport-auto-user role.
  • Be assigned all roles from the Teleport user's role set that match the database. The role names must be valid and exist in the database.

MySQL limits usernames to 32 characters. When the Teleport username is within this limit, the user created within the database will have the same name as the Teleport username. When the Teleport username is over the 32 character limit, the user created within the database will have the name in the format of tp-<base64-sha1-teleport-username>.

The original Teleport username will be saved as user attributes within the databases.

User can find its own attributes in an auto-provisioned database session by:

SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.USER_ATTRIBUTES WHERE CONCAT(USER, '@', HOST) = current_user();

Database admins can search a particular Teleport username by:

SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.USER_ATTRIBUTES WHERE ATTRIBUTE->"$.user" = "teleport-user-name";

In addition, the "hashed" in-database name will be recorded as db_user for database queries in the Teleport Audit Logs, when the Teleport username is over 32 characters.

Note that in case of a name conflict where a user with the same name already exists in the database and is not managed by Teleport (i.e. not assigned the teleport-auto-user role), the connection will be aborted.

Step 3/3. Connect to the database

Now, log into your Teleport cluster and connect to the database:

tsh login --proxy=teleport.example.com
tsh db connect --db-name <database> example
Database Username

When connecting to a database with user provisioning enabled, the Database Service expects your Teleport username will be used as the database username .

If using a GUI database client like MySQL Workbench, make sure to use your Teleport username as the database username. tsh db connect will default to your Teleport username automatically when connecting to a database with user provisioning enabled.

When connecting to a leaf cluster database with user provisioning enabled, the Database Service expects the database username to be remote-<your-teleport-username>-<root-cluster-name>.

To view the list of database roles that are allowed for each database, you can use the command tsh db ls -v. By default, all database roles will be assigned to your auto-provisioned database user. You can optionally select a subset of the database roles with --db-roles:

tsh db connect --db-name <database> --db-roles reader example

Troubleshooting

Access denied to database error

By default, the newly created users won't have permissions to access any particular database. These permissions should be granted through database-specific roles, such as reader.

Otherwise you may see errors like the following:

$ tsh db connect --db-name <database> example
ERROR 1105 (HY000): ERROR 1044 (42000): Access denied for user '<your-teleport-username>'@'%' to database '<database>'

Table is read only error

You may encounter the following error when connecting to an AWS RDS Aurora reader endpoint:

$ tsh db connect --db-name <database> example
ERROR 3501 (HY000): The ACL operation failed due to the following error from SE: errcode 165 - Table is read only

Database auto-user provisioning is not compatible with RDS Aurora reader endpoints. Please use auto-user provisioning on the primary endpoints.

Use your mapped remote username error

You may encounter the following error when connecting to a database in a remote cluster:

> tsh db connect --db-name <database> example
ERROR: please use your mapped remote username ("remote-<your-teleport-username>-<root-cluster-name>") to connect instead of "<database-user>"

When you access resources in a remote cluster, the remote cluster will receive the name remote-<your-teleport-username>-<root-cluster-name> from the local cluster. This is to prevent any naming collisions with users in the remote cluster. Please use the username from the error message as the database username for when connecting through tsh or GUI clients.

Next steps